The Role of Foods of Animal Origin in Human Nutrition and Health

Ndlovu, Lindela R (2010) The Role of Foods of Animal Origin in Human Nutrition and Health. UNSPECIFIED.

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Official URL: http://ir.nust.ac.zw/xmlui/handle/123456789/261

Abstract

Book Chapter from the book:The Role of Livestock in Developing Communities: Enhancing Multifunctionality by Frans Swanepoel, Aldo Stroebel and Siboniso Moyo,In poor developing communities, livestock serve many functions including supply of food, fibre and draught power, income generation and enhancement of social status. The relationship among animal-source foods and human nutrition and health is complex and involves both positive and negative trade-offs and outcomes. The positive outcomes are mostly through their addressing malnutrition by supplying the essential nutrients that are lacking in plant-source foods. Among these are micronutrients such iron, zinc, vitamin B-12, riboflavin and conjugated linoleic acids. In addition, supplementing the diet of pregnant women and children with foods of animal origin has resulted in improved maternal, foetal and child health outcomes such as successful births, reduced maternal mortality, increased prenatal growth rates and improved cognitive functions. There are potential risks associated with (over) consumption of foods of animal origin such as increased risks of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and obesity. However, at moderate levels of intake, foods of animal origin do not pose such threats and recent research indicates that they may actually be beneficial in reducing these diseases. Livestock?s potential contribution to environmental pollution and to total greenhouse gas emissions is recognised, but it is limited in the production systems available to poor communities where the nutritional and health benefits that accrue from consumption of foods of animal origin greatly outweigh the danger posed by livestock. Increasing the production of foods of animal origin at household level and linking this increased production to nutrition and the health of mothers and children is thus recommended for developing communities.

Item Type: Other
Uncontrolled Keywords: Livestock,Multifunctionality,Malnutrition,Micronutrients,Developing Countries
Divisions: Universities > State Universities > National University of Science and Technology
Depositing User: Mr. Edmore Sibanda
Date Deposited: 01 Dec 2015 00:31
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2015 00:31
URI: http://researchdatabase.ac.zw/id/eprint/1209

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