A study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of people in accepting male circumcision as a preventive method in HIV and AIDS, in Mbare and Southerton suburbs of Harare, Zimbabwe

Chigondo, Etiya Edith (2010) A study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of people in accepting male circumcision as a preventive method in HIV and AIDS, in Mbare and Southerton suburbs of Harare, Zimbabwe. UNSPECIFIED thesis, UNSPECIFIED.

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Official URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10646/1267

Abstract

This study explored the knowledge levels, beliefs and attitudes on male circumcision as an HIV intervention among a non-circumcising society within a country with high levels of heterosexually- transmitted infection. The study sought to gain an insight on the acceptability of male circumcision in Mbare and Southerton suburbs of Harare, Zimbabwe. A sample of 20 males who were circumcised at a health facility, 20 non- circumcised males and 20 females were reached. Three focus group discussions were held, one for non-circumcised men, one for women with circumcised partners and one for women with non-circumcised partners. Interviews were held with men circumcised at health facilities and one Key Informant (medical practitioner) from Spilhaus, Harare Hospital. Forty-seven percent of the respondents showed knowledge on the relationship between male circumcision and the prevention of HIV and AIDS. Educational attainment and different religious beliefs impact on the prevalence of male circumcision. Highly educated men sought male circumcision services more than others with secondary and primary level of education. Men who do not belong to any religion contributed the highest number of circumcised men. A significant number of women expressed that they will bring in their sons for circumcision. All most all of the circumcised men denied that male circumcision reduces sexual pleasure. A significant number of men cited stigma associated with male circumcision. Women’s role in male circumcision is seen in the preoperative and postoperative stages of male circumcision so that they provide care for the male. For men, the main predictors of circumcision preference pertained to beliefs surrounding sexual pleasure; for women, knowledge about the relationship between male circumcision status and sexually transmitted infections acquisition was the key indicator for circumcision preference. Among both sexes the main barrier to circumcision was fear of pain and death. The study thus noted that the community is not aware of the benefits of male circumcision and hence making it difficult to accept it as an HIV preventive measure. Awareness and education campaigns to increase people’s awareness on the benefits of male circumcision are needed in reducing the risk of HIV

Item Type: Thesis (UNSPECIFIED)
Uncontrolled Keywords: HIV intervention,male circumcision,circumcision preference,sexually transmitted infections,circumcised men
Divisions: Universities > State Universities > University of Zimbabwe
Depositing User: Mr. Edmore Sibanda
Date Deposited: 12 Dec 2015 22:01
Last Modified: 12 Dec 2015 22:01
URI: http://researchdatabase.ac.zw/id/eprint/1698

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