RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FEMALE CAREGIVERS SELF-CARE KNOWLEDGE ON PREVENTION OF MALARIA AND EPISODES OF MALARIA AMONG UNDER FIVES AT HAUNA HOSPITAL.

Ushamba, Winnie (2013) RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FEMALE CAREGIVERS SELF-CARE KNOWLEDGE ON PREVENTION OF MALARIA AND EPISODES OF MALARIA AMONG UNDER FIVES AT HAUNA HOSPITAL. UNSPECIFIED thesis, UNSPECIFIED.

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Official URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10646/1052

Abstract

According to the Zimbabwe National Health Strategy (2009) malaria ranked the highest cause of outpatient attendances accounting for all 11.5% of all attendances. Malaria was also the second cause of mortality in all age groups. The problem was the increasing number of malaria episodes in the under fives as seen from the Hospital records. In Hauna there were many children coming with repeated attacks of malaria within the same season, despite the National Malaria Control Programme in place particularly in Mutasa District. Thirty countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia account for 98% of global malaria episodes and deaths (WHO, 2004). The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between female care-givers self-care knowledge on prevention of malaria and episodes of malaria among the under fives. Orem’s Conceptual framework was used to guide this study. A descriptive correlational study design was used. Face to face structured interviews were used to collect demographic data, data on self-care knowledge and episodes of malaria, from 80 subjects who met the inclusion criteria. Data were analysed using the descriptive and inferential statistics. Pearson Correlation test was used to analyse the relationship between malaria prevention self-care knowledge and episodes of malaria and r was (r=.016; p>.01) results showed a non-significant relationship between self-care knowledge on malaria prevention and episodes of malaria. The results, therefore, did not support the premise that when self-care knowledge on malaria prevention increases, the number of malaria episodes decreases as proposed in the study. Further research is needed to establish more factors that could be impacting on malaria episodes in children and explore relationship between self-care practices and episodes. Nursing practice should strengthen information dissemination to all communities on malaria.

Item Type: Thesis (UNSPECIFIED)
Uncontrolled Keywords: malaria
Divisions: Universities > State Universities > University of Zimbabwe
Depositing User: Mr. Edmore Sibanda
Date Deposited: 09 Jan 2016 23:32
Last Modified: 09 Jan 2016 23:32
URI: http://researchdatabase.ac.zw/id/eprint/2948

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