From “boys” to “men”? African and black masculinities, triangular desire, race, and subalternity in Charles Mungoshi’s short stories

Mutekwa, Anias (2013) From “boys” to “men”? African and black masculinities, triangular desire, race, and subalternity in Charles Mungoshi’s short stories.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02533952.2013.798504

Abstract

This article looks at African and black men and masculinities, triangulated desire, race, and subalternity in Charles Mungoshi’s short story collections. It examines the negotiation of desire, and its interface and interplay with power relations and their negotiation in the colonial and postcolonial economies of domination and gender as depicted in the short stories. It uses the Gramscian concept of hegemony, Girard’s mimetic theory of triangular desire, and Sedgwick’s theory of gendered triangular desire, to examine these dynamics. It argues that colonial and postcolonial power and gender relations are negotiated through a complex interplay of desire that cannot all be accounted for by both Girard and Sedgwick’s models, necessitating their modification to deal with the complexity of desire in a colonial and postcolonial context. The short story collections examined span the colonial and postcolonial eras and these are Coming of the Dry Season (1981), Some Kinds of Wounds (1980), and Walking Still (1997).

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Boys; men; masculinities; triangular desire; colonial; postcolonial
Divisions: Universities > State Universities > Midlands State University
Depositing User: Mr. Edmore Sibanda
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2017 22:03
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2017 22:03
URI: http://researchdatabase.ac.zw/id/eprint/5901

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